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DID YOU KNOW? The Canadian Food and Drugs Regulations require that food labels list the ingredients added to a prepackaged food product. However, lupin is not part of the list of priority allergens in Canada and is therefore not required to appear in a "contains" statement, if one is provided on the food label to inform food allergic consumers. (Source: Government of Canada)

Food allergy risk: Lupin must now be identified in meals (New Zealand)


Barfblog.com by Doug Powell, June 7, 2018

Andrew Thomson writes that hospitals and aged-care facilities providing meals to patients should be aware that Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) has changed the Food Standards Code to require lupin to be declared when present in a food as an ingredient, or component of ingredients, including food additives and processing aids.

As at 26 May 2018, all foods must comply with the new requirement of declaring lupin in food.

Lupin is a high protein legume which is (GM-free and gluten-free) like soy and peanut and has the potential to be an allergen. Some people who are allergic to peanuts may also be allergic to lupin.

Lupin has not been commonly used in Australian or New Zealand foods. However, it can be found in a wide range of food products including bread, bakery and pasta products, sauces, beverages and meat-based products such as burgers and sausages. Gluten-free or soy-free products may sometimes contain lupin.

In light of the Victorian Coroner’s recent findings in regard to the death of Louis Tate, this is an issue all food service managers and chefs should be on top off and is discussed in the Winter Edition of the Australian Hospital + Healthcare Bulletin.